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Salamanca Poker How To Play

 

Texas Hold 'em | 7 Card Stud | Omaha | Crazy Pineapple

 

Texas Hold 'em

• Texas Hold'em uses a dealer button to indicate which player will receive cards first and where the action will start for every betting round.
• To begin, one or more "blind" bets are placed to create action in the first betting round. A "blind" bet constitutes all or part of the player's wager and must be "posted" before the player receives any cards, unless a specific game or situation deems otherwise.
• The player closest to the left of the button must post the "Small Blind" – approximately half of the minimum bet for the first betting round. The player to the left of the "Small Blind" must post the "Big Blind" which is equal to the minimum bet for the first betting round.
• Players are allowed to check and raise, with a maximum of three raises per betting round. If action becomes "heads up" (only two active players remaining) before a third raise is made, there is no limit to the number of raises that the remaining players can make.
• Players are dealt two down cards followed by another round of betting. Action starts with the person to the left of the player who posted the "Big Blind."
• This betting round is followed by three cards (also called the "Flop") being dealt face-up in the middle of the table. The "Flop" is followed by a round of betting started by the active player who is sitting closest to the left of the button.
• Two additional cards are turned face-up in the middle of the table, one at a time, each followed by a betting round.
• Players may use any combination of their two down cards and the five board cards to create their best five card Poker hand – including using all five board cards. The standard ranking of hands applies when determining the value of a player's hand.

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7 Card Stud

• To begin, players are dealt two down cards and one up card, followed by a round of betting. The first round of betting starts with a predetermined "force bet" – a mandatory bet by the player with the lowest up card – the amount of which varies from limit to limit. Following this betting round, three additional up cards are dealt one at a time, with a betting round following each card. Then, a final down card is dealt followed by the last betting round.
• The initial action, also known as the "force bet," is made by the player with the lowest ranking up card, ranked by suit, if necessary, with aces always counting as high. On all following betting rounds, the player whose up cards form the highest ranking hand starts the action.
• In a structured limit game (e.g. $10-$20 Stud), on the first betting round any player – including the one with the low card – may bet either the force bet amount or the lower structured amount for that betting round.
• After the structured bet has been made, all calls and/or raises must be made by the structured bet amount. In a spread limit game (e.g. $1-$5 Stud), on the first betting round any player (including the player with the low card) may bet any amount within the limits at any time. All raises must be greater than or equal to the previous bet or raise, but cannot exceed the maximum dollar limit for that game.
• Players are allowed to check and raise, with a maximum of three raises per betting round. If action becomes "heads up" (only two active players remaining) before the third raise is made, there is no limit to the number of raises that the remaining players can make.
• If there is a tie in determining initial action for a betting round, the player with the tied hand who is sitting closest to the left of the dealer is responsible for starting the action for that betting round.
• If there is an open pair on the fourth card in a structured game, any active player has the choice of making a bet or raise at the higher limit.
• The standard ranking of hands applies when determining the value of a player's hand. A player may only use five of their seven cards.

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Omaha

• This game is a variation of Texas Hold'em. To begin, each player receives four down cards in their hand and shares five board (community) cards. Players determine the value of their five card hand by using any two cards from their hand with any three cards from the board. This is the only way a player can formulate their hand. The standard ranking of hands applies.
Omaha High-Low
• A variation of Omaha allowing the best high hand to split the pot with the best low hand.
• Straights and flushes do not count against the value of a low hand. Therefore, the best low hand is 5-4-3-2-A, also known as a "bicycle" or a "wheel."
Omaha High-Low (Eight or Better)
• Played in the identical manner as Omaha High-Low, but with a "qualifier" for the low hand. A player needs all five of their low cards unpaired and less than nine to qualify for low. The high hand will win the whole pot if there is no qualifying low hand.
• A player may have the best high hand and low hand and may use a different combination of cards to make each the low and then the high hand.

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Crazy Pineapple

Crazy Pineapple is a Texas Hold 'em game very similar to regular Texas Hold 'em. However, there are two significant differences in Crazy Pineapple, which do change the game quite a bit:
1. You start with three (3) hole cards
In regular Texas Hold 'em, the player starts with two hole cards. In Crazy Pineapple, the player starts with three, creating many more possible good starting hands, and many more hands that can work with the flop.
2. In Crazy Pineapple, you throw a hole card away
Just as in regular Texas Hold 'em, there is a betting round after players receive their hole cards, and another betting round after they see the flop. However, in Pineapple a very important change happens here. AFTER betting on the flop is completed, players must discard one of their hole cards.
For example, if you start with a hand of (8h-8s-Jh) and then see a flop of 10h-9h-8d, you have a pretty big decision to make. If you want to keep your open-ended straight flush draw, you're going to have to discard one of your trip eights (a pleasant dilemma, but a dilemma nonetheless). If you want to keep the trips, you need to throw away the the key card in the straight flush draw.
Crazy Pineapple really is an odd hybrid of Texas Hold ‘em and Omaha. The average winning hands are stronger in Pineapple than they are in Texas Hold 'em, because you get to look at more combinations on the flop. Occasionally you will make a stronger hand in Crazy Pineapple than you would have in Omaha, even though players get four hole cards in Omaha, because Pineapple does not share the Omaha "you must use two and exactly two of your hole cards in your final hand" rule.
For example, if your Omaha hand was Ac-Qd-Jc-10d, and the final community board was Ah-As-5c-5h-8c, you do NOT have a full house, but rather only trip aces with a Q-8 kicker, because you must play at least two cards from your hand and can't just add the ace in your hand to the two pair on board to make aces full of fives. In Crazy Pineapple, had you kept an ace in your hand after the post-flop discard, the five on the turn would have given you a full house, just as if you'd started with A-J or A-Q in Texas Hold 'em.
We’re sure that you’ll find Crazy Pineapple a fun game to play because of the extra strong flops and extra key decision about which cards to keep after the flop.

 

 

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